“With only enough time to unpack from our trip to Portland Jaclyn suggests we rent a jalopy and drive our tired souls to North Carolina for the High Point Furniture Market.”

The HP Furniture Market is a Mecca for designers and business owners to network, in-person with manufacturers and gets you in on the know-know. Jaclyn runs a furniture boutique here in Kansas City (the Coveted Home) and making it to events like this can be essential for success. It’s far more than furniture though. Hoards of vendors bring in antiquities and handcrafted goods from around the globe; Southeast Asian, African, you name it. All the while parties are raging. Good drinks and vibes to go around tenfold. Who could pass this up?

Her suggestion ignited an even greater plan; raid this designers “treasure trove” and hit the Smoky Mountains. Taking with us our camping gear, we would mosey along, sampling from local cuisine and the Appalachian Trail.

A week later we were renting that van and on the road with our dog and a cooler stocked with cheese…

Step 1- Kansas City, MO to Franklin, NC

(822 Miles/12 hours and 32 minutes)

Saint Louis, Missouri

Our first sight is the iconic Gateway Arch of St. Louis, MO.  This 630-ft arch is the tallest manmade monument in the states and I must admit, this photo, given the weather, does little justice for the true beauty of this beast.

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We reserve our energy by sleeping through the route between St. Louis and Franklin. Driving and snoozing, equal shifts between Jaclyn, myself, and Simone…

The following morning we’re witness to the beginnings of the Appalachians splendor as we enter North Carolina.

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Early morning sun, burning the Smoky Mountain haze.

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As the sun begins to peak, so does Simone, leaf peeping.

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Fall foliage begins to reveal its orchestrated plumes and hues of autumns tune.

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Taking in a dose of Americana; Avett Brothers blaring, banjo picking, snare drum kicking.

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Franklin, North Carolina

Arriving midday at our first destination we pop our tent and hit the trails

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For those points where it’s hard to distinguish between game trails and the actual hiking trail, cairns are strategically placed along to keep the pious hiker safely on the right route.

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About an hour in, we run into these two who have been out here for days, working their way around the lower AT. They apparently had a run in with a small black bear earlier in the day. Nothing these two champs can’t handle.

With the sun setting, temperature dropping, we spend a few hours fighting the elements to get a fire started, burning through 3/4 of the journal I brought to document this trip… And for a brief moment we actually had a fire raging, cooking our bundles of carrots, potatoes, onions, and turmeric wrapped in foil, roasting with a can of beans and cheese. Enough to heat our food before the moisture snuffed out our flame for good. Eating to the musical backdrop of Appalachia we welcomed the darkness in excitement for the days to come.

The Appalachian Road Trip will return in Franklin to High Point.

Yallah, Bye

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Before the world can truly reveal itself you must take a period of meditation. A time of reflection. To pre-game, to set a cosmic course of action by stating your intentions and making them manifest. This is the driving force behind Sketching Sights. To become one with the elements of each and every environment that strikes me.

Dreaming of old Bagan I left brush and paint to guide themselves across the stars and secure my itinerary.

Burma on my mind

Scattered about the enchanting valley of Bagan are the remains of some 2,000 structures (monasteries, temples and pagodas). Historically this land housed over 4,000–each one thoughtfully placed and with purpose.

With this country of monks, gold clad domes and incantations opening its doors I see no other location more relevant to our cause at Yallah’Bye. That is, to document indigenous cultures at risk in this world of globalization.

Burma 2018?

Until next time

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SaveSave

Before the world can truly reveal itself you must take a period of meditation. A time of reflection. To pre-game, to set a cosmic course of action by stating your intentions and making them manifest. This is the driving force behind Sketching Sights. To become one with the elements of each and every environment that strikes me.

Dreaming of old Bagan I left brush and paint to guide themselves across the stars and secure my itinerary.

Burma on my mind

Scattered about the enchanting valley of Bagan are the remains of some 2,000 structures (monasteries, temples and pagodas). Historically this land housed over 4,000–each one thoughtfully placed and with purpose.

With this country of monks, gold clad domes and incantations opening its doors I see no other location more relevant to our cause at Yallah’Bye. That is, to document indigenous cultures at risk in this world of globalization.

Burma 2015?

Until next time–Yallah’Bye

Ourika, Morocco

 

547357_3665455120320_1240248596_nThough only 6 hours (460 km) separate Marrakech from the oasis town of M’Hamid I could have dedicated six days between the two place names. The villages that scatter Ourika Valley hold their own against the more popular Imperial Cities (Marrakech, Fes, Meknes and Rabat) and it’s out here in the wilderness of the High Atlas Mountains that I come across the Cafe Tajine.

An hour outside Marrakech the Cafe Tajine emerges from an icy riverbed along the narrow road that parallels the River Ourika. Makeshift bridges of repurposed woods and carpets reach across the river at many points along the route, leading to mud-brick villages, markets, and, in this case, one of the finest dining experiences i’ve had to date. 

Here, for a few dollars (it’s truly a steal), you can feast like royalty. A spread of three tajines, salads, breads, mint tea, and a few beggars in between will cost you around the same price as the new Jay-Z album.

Tajines are made to order and, like most “Old World” recipes can take a good deal of time to cook. This is when the industrious locals strike. Peddling handmade goods, women and children make offers on African keepsakes and jewelry boxes, even crystals, as men serenade us, strumming the guitar-like Moroccan sintir and playing unusual flutes and drums.

Over the melodious North Africa beats we dine late into the night, taking our sweet time, dancing and haggling away.

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Yallah bye

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Mount Hood rising beyond Portland proper.

With Portland’s philosophical temperament, insane amount of breweries (something like 71) , and solid, mellow vibes it’s hard to break away from the inner city. Yet, when you manage to, the surrounding areas contain an abundance of natural beauty. Moving away from the bells and whistles of city life, the call of the wild echoes from the mountain tops into the heart of PDX, emerging from the cobblestone streets as a powerful guide, taking you off the pavement and into the wild itself.

In no particular order, I present to you the wild, the ever inspiring, somewhat touristic sights of PDX

The Japanese Gardens

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There’s an influential air of tranquility in the 5.5 acre park where stones mingle with plants and water to create a sense of harmony, balance between worlds. Said to be the most authentic Japanese garden outside of the motherland, the park is separated into five equally important sections displaying traditional flora alongside indigenous plants for a solid assimilation of nature.

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Apparently, this Pagoda came as a gift from the Mayor of Sapporo (Portland’s sister city in Japan) in 1963. There are actually several relics on site. Treasures from Japan, only adding to the holistic beauty.

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“Shishi Odoshi”- Translating to “scare the deer”

I was under the impression that these “shishi odoshi” were used to keep track of time or perhaps for meditation… Nope! This bamboo fountain is truly used to keep birds and other animals away that may otherwise snack on the bounty of plants in the garden. However, like magic, it certainly moves ones bladder!

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Multnomah Falls

As the tallest waterfall in the state of Oregon this site has become somewhat of a roadside spectacle. Easily accessible and equipped with it’s very own on-site lodge, Multnomah makes for a great pit stop after visiting the Wahkeena Falls. There’s even a great trail which loops up and around Wahkeena, then back down passing Multnomah.

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 The upper fall at 542 feet is not the source of the ray beam that white washed this photo to near dust…

Wahkeena Falls

While the lesser of our two falls, I find Wahkeena more striking. More gradual, the site less trafficked, and the immediate hiking trail, gorgeous.

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At this vantage point, by the water, it felt at least 10 degrees cooler in the already chill Oregonian fall.

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Peeking over the Columbia River

Forest Park

With something like 70 miles of hiking trails, Forest Park is obviously competing with the breweries in town in an all out mile vs. brewpub showdown. The trails in here contain a striking dose of deep backwoods remoteness. Enough to satiate most appetites. There’s even a movement in the works that will connect a portion of the park to the Pacific Crest Trail. So, Forest Park will technically be part of a 2,600 mile range of trails…

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An early 20th century rest stop along one of Forest Park’s endless trails.

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As you ascend higher, Forest Park begins to fan out. Tree growth becomes more sparse, while ferns dominate the grounds which are far less moist than in the deeper ravines.

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The further you hike, the less noise pollution, the less passerby’s. All that despite the fact that we’re maybe a mile from the city center, well, as the crow flies.

Sauvie Island

Nude beaches, vegetable gardens, and geese hunting. The common denominator? Sauvie Island.

Larger than Manhattan and certainly more sustainable, Sauvie is one of those great escapes that transport you to another time. Farmers markets, pumpkin patches in the fall, U-pick farms, quiet dirt roads, and all surrounded by the calming Columbia River just 10 miles west of PDX.

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At one point a massive freighter passed by sending swells up the beach.

 We found our way to the island for a picnic. Equipped with a bottle of Kansas City’s finest brew and a pack of nuts, we had an exceptional, minimalistic, beach experience.

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Arabic in the sand…

Always working, even on vacation. I had to throw down a little Arabic.

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Ok, i’m clearly a grease-pit who had too much to drink. Jaclyn, however, is charming as ever completing our yin-yang look

The List Goes On…

2013-10-05 13.27.35The suicidal Mt. St. Helens.

This is only a sample of the more accessible sights. The list really goes on and on… Mount Hood, the Pacific Coast, Willamette Valley (post coming on my vineyard experiences soon).

As with the eats of PDX, I’m already planning for the sights of my next trip.

So, what do you think? Did I miss anything truly special?

Yallah, bye!

If you’re reading this, it means i’m currently on the road.

Somewhere, out there, rummaging through the idiosyncrasies of our world to bring back and share with you.

This week, it’s a road trip to the city of High Point, NC where i’m following Jaclyn to the furniture market. While her mission is that of business, mine is to explore a region unfamiliar to me. To sample the local eats, camp among black bears under a blaze of autumnal colors in Appalachia, and get to know my fellow Americans to the East.

I’d love to have you tag along by following me on Twitter or Instagram, as i’m sure to be hyperactive on either account.

 

Until next time,

Yallah, bye!

 

 

 

 

 

I’m always happy to return home after a vacation. Whether months abroad or a week in South Texas, i’m forever eager to return to my adopted homeland of Kansas City, Missouri. Don’t get me wrong I thrive in alien lands and obsess over travel. But it doesn’t get much better than being in my tiny apartment with my girlfriend, our dog, and a deep bowl of cornflakes… that’s just me!

Over the last two weeks I roamed between Hot Springs, Arkansas and San Antonio/Austin, Texas. Nothing too crazy, outside much needed time with family. And despite the fact that I had more free time than usual, I decided to keep my fingers away from the keyboard.

So here’s a collection of photographs I took while away. It’s kind of a way to apologize for my absence! The majority of the contents mean a lot to me personally so I hope you enjoy the show.

San Antonio- At the Mercado. A lively Mexican bazaar bursting with culture.

Dia de Muertos. Day of the Dead will be here before we know it. Are you ready?

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The red brick pedestrian streets are silent as a storm is about to roll in (never mind the blue skies!). Typically the streets are booming. Shoulder to shoulder you merge between empanada vendors and Peruvian flute bands.

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The following photos were taken at my parents in Canyon Lake, Texas

Agave americana. I planted this beast in 2008. In that short span of time it’s reached nearly 6 feet in height! I’m hoping one day to try my hand at a little agave-mezcal alchemy.

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Fig tree.

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On a hike in Canyon Lake

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photo-8 photo-7The sexy prickly pear. A personal favorite.

photo-10Here’s a photo of my parents and the family business. Excuse the Instagram filter…

photo-2A new piece by the artist Bryan Hauteman (better known as my brother). This cat is worth keeping your eyes on.

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Leontopodium alpinum. The Edelweiss- Growing between 6,000 and 10,000 feet this beauty is known as the “Ultimate love charm of the alps”. My Oma brought this specimen from Germany when she migrated to the States.

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Austin

On the side of Jo’s Coffee Shop, the famed graffiti…

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Not much, but it will have to do.

How was your Labor Day weekend?

Yallah, bye

Nicholas Andriani will return in Oh, Hookah of the Magic Bowl. Premiering this Monday.

Trekking Wadi Musa w/ Camels!

So this is where it all began. On an archaeological dig out in Jordan I found myself spending a little too much time wandering aimlessly through the country. After the longest, sleepless, most bone chilling night camping out in Petra I found these beautiful creatures. Running through the narrow Siq I was more than ready to get back to Wadi Musa for some breakfast but who could pass up this opportunity?

Now a year later, back home, going through all the pictures and mementos I came across this image once more. With it I knew there was a story to be told. And with this image an idea was planted to share my journey. So here we are, in the vast sea of blogs on the World Wide Web with a new story to be told…