A case in Airbnb

There’s a new craze going from town to town, calling on travelers to break the mundane and deconstruct that rigid barrier between local and outsider. This movement is manifest in vehicles such as Airbnb.

If you’re unfamiliar with the concept think of it as a refined, more mature approach to hosteling or couchsurfing. Which never really took off in the US so I decided to try my hand at this more popular alternative.

Maybe it’s the communal aspect or the in-house local expertise that I find more inviting but I’ve realized that hotels now feel too impersonal to me. Sure, it’s great to unwind after a day of sightseeing in a private suite but that’s not why I travel.

It’s more about sharing stories with people of other vocations and nationalities.

Airbnb allows for unprecedented twists on traditional travel. Instead of the Hilton in Marrakech, rent a Riad inside the Medina. Avoid that resort on the Mediterranean by staying in a secluded bungalow on the same beach but away from “touristopolis”. In fact, it’s easier to rent a castle than to book a room at an all-inclusive resort through their website! They’re on to something and I’m on to them.

So we decided it was time to give Airbnb a chance. Two weeks ago today Jaclyn and I found ourselves in California, at the front door of a stranger’s house that we met online. Nothing kinky, just a little getaway for my 25th birthday.

It had taken a while to narrow down our choices for accommodation. From furnished houses to empty apartments we searched until coming across the listing “Cabin in the Garden”. A 20 minute walk from the beach the cabin shares property with a communal house of four, a tree house overlooking a vegetable garden, and serves as a spiritual retreat from the Los Angeles beat.

We had several interactions with our host via email and poured through reviews left by previous guests. It was clear that this home was an open place. One that welcomes all people and strives to leave little impact on our planet. Quirky hippie vibes and a “come as you are” mentality was invite enough.

When it came down to it we found ourselves spending half the price we would have for a hotel in the area. Our host and other house guests fed us priceless information about local restaurants, helped us weigh what sights were worth seeing versus those of hype, and made us feel like a part of LA.

But if there’s still an air of awkwardness when you walk up to the front door of a stranger’s house who is about to open their world to you–just embrace it and go with the flow. Otherwise, book that hotel room that would cost twice as much.

 

IMG_0366
The “Cabin in the Garden” or “Cabin” in the Garden… Rustic, but very comfortable. Bordered by a fig tree and overlooking their garden.

 

IMG_0356
Interior of our “Cabin”. Has the feeling of an artists studio. Complete with floor pillows, books on yoga, and a loft space for the bed

 

The Pod
The Pod- Another accommodation on site. Designed by one of the residents who found inspiration in her time living off-the-grid in Latin America. Similar to the Cabin on the inside the Pod stands apart in its organic design and placement in the garden itself.
unnamed-4
The tree house- While it isn’t listed on Airbnb would be a great place to spend the night under the ever so cool breeze of the Pacific winds. Equipped with prayer flags, hammock, and clothesline- what more could you want?
unnamed-3
Ah, the bountiful Lemon tree. I’m already missing the fragrant wind that swirled around the sweet aromas of the garden. There’s no wasted space. Plants and nooks in every corner.

 

unnamed
A link in their chain of well laid garden space.
unnamed-1
Everything has it’s place.

How could we not walk away with a sense of peace? Overall our visit couldn’t have been better–moving with the Angelenos in their easy-going ebb and flow contradicting the norms of “big city” livin’. It’s a wonderful place.

Interested in booking the Cabin in the Garden? Here’s the link- LINK

until next time–yallah’bye

*photo credits to Jaclyn Joslin